Focus Your Inner Lens to Stay in the Moment

Focus Your Inner Lens to Stay in the Moment

By | 2019-04-08T23:25:25+00:00 April 8th, 2019|focus|0 Comments

Learn to focus your inner lens and strengthen your ability to stay in the moment when anxiety, fear, and disorder arrive. This will help you in infinite ways as you meet the many situations of your life.

As a person who has struggled with anxiety, learning how to focus my jumpy, reactive mind was a necessity. Starting to meditate was my first step. As I mentioned in my blog from a few weeks ago, Meditation Is a Brain Changer, my brain started to heal and change through a simple and dedicated practice. After only a week of daily practice (I’m talking 3 to 5 minutes a day), I started to gain a new perspective on my life, which.. brought me to a new type of learning.

In last week’s blog, I talked about the effects of Deep Noticing, which encourages us to pay attention to the many aspects of who we are. When we pay attention like this, we focus our inner lens. We turn inward and inquire why certain feelings and sensations have come up. Rather than pushing them away, we open doors to healing through what shows up.

Focus Your Inner Lens is a simple exercise you can bring to your life each day. I love how it resets and energizes not only my physical eyes but my energetic third eye too. The third eye is a part of the chakra system. I feel my spirit through the third eye center, and with a steady practice of returning to this center, I feel a closeness to the deepest parts of who I am.  

Focus Your Inner Lens Practice

  1. Find a comfortable seat (or you can do the practice in bed). Take three rounds of the long deep breath.
  2. Feel all the sensations, emotions, and responses that come through. Do your best to bring your attention back to the breath, rather than getting snagged by a certain situation or feeling. Let the experience flow through you. The breath will support this.
  3. Once you have felt the breath move in and out of you three times, bring two fingers to the middle of your forehead and gently tap around the center of your forehead. Find a spot that feels sensitive, then bring your breath to that spot and inhale and exhale through that point. Do this for three rounds of breath. Once you have completed three rounds, feel the energy that flows through this center. You have activated the third eye center. This experience will be very subtle in the beginning but will grow stronger as you practice.
  4. Open your eyes, find a spot on the wall, the corner of a window, or a specific object. Bring your physical eyes to focus on that place. Do the long deep breath for three full rounds and hold your attention there. (This may take a few tries–keep going, you’ll get it.)
  5. Now combine the two exercises with your eyes open. Find your third eye, that spot that feels sensitive on your forehead. Then bring your physical eyes to focus on that place on the wall. Do the long deep breath for three full rounds and hold your attention there.

Do this exercise every day for a week or longer before you get up in the morning and during the day when you feel your mind racing. I have found that if I can identify when my anxious mind is spinning, I can do something to help it calm down.

This practice is simple and effective and can be done anywhere. Bring it into your life, share it with a friend, and watch the spinning stop and the wonder begin.

About the Author:

Sarah Brassard’s passion lies in teaching people how to create a foundation for self-care, a method of wellness that brings profound opportunities for transformation. She is the author of Inside: A Guide to the Resources Within to Stay Vibrant and Alive Through All Life’s Challenges. The book details the self-care practices and protocols that sparked her healing journey and that she has been sharing with students and clients for the past fifteen years.

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